Chanel Celebrates Sisterhood at Tribeca Film Fest

Some of Hollywood’s most powerful and impactful women came together on Friday to toast to the future of women in film at Chanel and Tribeca’s 2024 luncheon.

Hosted by the French fashion house and Tribeca’s Jane Rosenthal, guests that included Kerry Washington, Katie Holmes, Selma Blair (and her dog Scout), Christy Turlington-Burns and more mingled over champagne and spritzes in Locanda Verde’s private courtyard garden in New York City. The room was filled with some of Chanel’s best looks from their most recent season including, tweed mini skirts, leather vests, flowy cotton blouses and lots of summer-ready denim.

selma blair

Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

Selma Blair

christy turlington burns

Matteo Prandoni/BFA.com

Christy Turlington-Burns

This year marked 10 years of Chanel and Tribeca’s Through Her Lens campaign, a filmmaking program that promotes and supports emerging female and non-binary talent in the industry through funding, project support, and dedicated mentorship. During the luncheon Rosenthal expressed the continued importance of the program saying, ““Both Tribeca and Chanel firmly believe that art is necessary to the human experience and needed all the more in times of trial and adversity. Society’s investment in artists and culture makes for a better world – and this is why Through Her Lens is even more imperative.”

new york, new york june 07 camila mendes, wearing chanel, attends the chanel tribeca festival women's lunch to celebrate the through her lens program at the greenwich hotel on june 07, 2024 in new york city photo by dimitrios kambouriswireimage

Dimitrios Kambouris

Camilla Mendes

new york, new york june 07 l r kerry washington, patty jenkins and av rockwell, wearing chanel, attend the chanel tribeca festival womens lunch to celebrate the through her lens program at the greenwich hotel on june 07, 2024 in new york city photo by dimitrios kambouriswireimage

Dimitrios Kambouris

Kerry Washington, Patty Jenkins, and AV Rockwell

new york, new york june 07 l r jane rosenthal and katie holmes, wearing chanel, attend the chanel tribeca festival womens lunch to celebrate the through her lens program at the greenwich hotel on june 07, 2024 in new york city photo by dimitrios kambouriswireimage

Dimitrios Kambouris

Jane Rosenthal and Katie Holmes

Following the luncheon, actor and producer Kerry Washington, director Patty Jenkins, and Emmy winning composer Laura Karpman, were joined by filmmaker and journalist Perri Peltz to discuss their individual careers as well as the current landscape for young filmmakers entering the current industry. During the hourlong conversation, all three panelists reflected on how each other’s work had at some point inspired each other—and the world at large.

“The fact that Wonder Woman and Black Panther came out around the same time…my daughters got to see all of their femininity empowered and all of their Blackness empowered. To be a mom raising Black girls in a time where those films were around was such an asset,” said Washington. “My mom would tell me ‘You’re a superhero’, but I had to take her word for it because pop culture at large was not mirroring that message. Representation is important because it’s our humanity. We tell stories to see ourselves more to see who we want to be or who we don’t want to be.”

new york, new york june 07 l r laura karpman, kerry washington and patty jenkins, all wearing chanel, speak onstage during the tribeca and chanel through her lens conversation at crosby street hotel on june 07, 2024 in new york city photo by dimitrios kambouriswireimage

Dimitrios Kambouris

Jenkins also reflected on the power of representation and intentional storytelling.

“We’ve used movies as these metaphors to educate our young, and I wish more filmmakers really realize the responsibility of that,” she said. “Not to say you can’t make a fun movie—but if you’re telling a campfire story that everybody needs to hear, think about what you could be bringing to the world. We’ve [existed] where only one type of story has been allowed for a very long time, and we can’t save the world if people’s voices aren’t being allowed to contribute.”

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Bianca Betancourt is the culture editor at HarpersBAZAAR.com, where she covers all things film, TV, music, and more. When she’s not writing, she loves impulsively baking a batch of cookies, re-listening to the same early-2000s pop playlist, and stalking Mariah Carey’s Twitter feed.